Archive | Regular objects RSS feed for this section

Literal Metaphor

3 Mar

One of the things we talk about in creativity is to think about what your limiting assumptions are. Identify them, and then figure out how you can push past them.

So you are trying to communicate about Gold’s Gym. You want to say “Hey, man, your body is a fine piece of machinery. It works, it moves, it lifts. And the more you work out, the more it becomes heavy machinery.  It can do whatever you want. And you have to go to the Gold’s Gym to make your machine even more powerful. So, shoot man, how do we say this?”**

How about you do JUST that. Don’t let the fact that it’s a metaphor hold you back. You show the man as machine. You literally translate your metaphor. You make the body into a machine. You listen to the words you are using and you realize you can do that. Well, you can DO it but you’ll find some cut dude and paint him naked for a few billion hours…

Which was more uncomfortable: Getting painted or holding this pose?

Yeah, welcome to the gun show!

Forklift. (I'm not liking this one as much, in all candor.)

**All of this was said in Spanish because this ad is from Costa Rica.

Top o’the drinkin’ to ya!

26 Feb

Two big points to make here:

Consumer touchpoints– anything that the consumer comes in contact with is a potential place to engage them. If you own it (salesperson shirts, beverage labels, delivery trucks) and you aren’t taking advantage of it, you are crazy. Even if you don’t own it, there are places you might be able to engage them. I tell my students that you could have members of your target market take pictures of whatever is in front of them with their phone and send it to you, and then it’s up to you to think about how you could engage them on anything in front of them.

Consumer experience– if consumers can find you in a strange and engaging place, they may be more entranced by your brand, like your brand is Lloyd Dobbler standing outside your window holding a boom-box over its head playing In Your Eyes. (Forgive me; I’m from the 80’s.)

Guinness has known about this for a while. They have a long pour that’s part of the “process” of getting a Guinness. And it’s thick and substantial, and they reinforce all of that with this:

Poofy and substantial enough on the top to take a shamrock. And if you got that, you’d be all “Cool!” And then you’d drink it and your poor, American, Bud Light-addled mouth would drink it and say “WTF is THIS??” (Push through; learn to drink a real beverage, my dudes.)

 

To engage your consumer somewhere surprising and temporary- like the top of your drink- is pretty cool.

 

Aww...

 

So what do we do with this information:

Brainstorming:

  • If you sell beverages and can stamp or draw a cute messages in there, do it. It’ll engage your target market, and reinforce a lovely little relationship.
  • If you don’t sell beverages, but know your TM consumes them the way Charlie Sheen consumes, well… nearly everything, can you engage them here? Is there some monochromatic message you can communicate?
  • And you don’t just want “matched luggage”- you want to think about how the beverage ties in with your message? If it’s a hot beverage, maybe good for a warm tourist destination, reinforcing a warm message. If it’s fluffy like in the beer or on a fluffy espresso, maybe something for something soft, or tall, or poofy. Or if it’s an enjoyable beverage and you know that people are sitting and relaxing, you could reinforce the “relaxing” or the “taking time” aspect. Brainstorm on the characteristic you want to reinforce.

 

Nautical Illusion

5 Nov

So this certainly would get your attention…

But really it’s a boat made into the optical illusion that it’s sinking. (More information about it here.)

You wouldn’t want to use this in a marketing communication just to get attention, like “Eat at Joe’s Crab Shack.” You’d want to figure out how it fits into the meaning of your communication. Like “We have quite a load of shrimp down here at Joe’s Crab Shack.” Although that’s a lot of words when you are hung over and hanging out on a beach.

Brainstorming:

  • This type of execution would be most effectively done as a “demonstration” of an issue or benefit. What can you demonstrate in your brand or brand meaning?
  • So why would this specific nonsinking sinking boat work? Are you talking about how heavy or big something is? Are you talking about being pulled down? Held back? About mysterious stuff underneath?  Are you in trouble? Stressed out? Having a bad day?

Vroom-vroom!

29 Oct

Innovative use of mundane objects to tell a completely different story. Notice how you spend some time looking at each aspect of each visual to see how they did it. That’s what you want a strategic communication do- be interesting on its own without turning up the volume and irritating everybody in the room. When you brainstorm on nontraditiona media placements, can you “see” things different ways, and make them into something new in way that supports the message?

 

Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: